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ScrewAttackThis t1_j6231dk wrote

Tl;dr: off duty cop tried to stop someone for driving recklessly and then shot them as they tried to get away.

The kicker might be him describing his intent as "a fatherly conversation" 🙄.

What bullshit. This fucker is going to keep doing it until someone dies.

E: shocked to say he abuses his own family. This guy is literally a giant pile of shit, wow

> Last March, Coventry police also arrested Dolan on domestic disorderly and vandalism charges. They charged that he grabbed his 10-year-old son by the neck and pushed him outside to get to school, then with the family in a car, threw a toy hard enough to break the windshield. Prosecutors dropped the charges days later.

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cellphone_blanket t1_j62m5xb wrote

I guess if he abuses his family, his intent for a "fatherly conversation" is more believable

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ScrewAttackThis t1_j62rph6 wrote

Fair point. Imagine saying that after being arrested for choking your 10 year old son.

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rabidstoat t1_j64if51 wrote

I'm reading a book on Leavenworth Prison and its history. There was a corrections officer working there who was a huge guy (300 pounds) and verbally and at times physically aggressive with inmates. He was also allegedly physically violent with his wife, daughter, and sons. At least once the wife moved out because of this but ultimately returned.

Turns out he was killed via shotgun by one of his teenaged sons, though it seems both were involved. There was a bit of an investigation and it all got swept under the rug, and no one was charged in the killing.

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throwawayaccyaboi223 t1_j6330u0 wrote

What the fuck how is that guy still a cop. Oh wait, they can get away with murder...

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[deleted] t1_j63ce40 wrote

[removed]

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skippyspk OP t1_j63xyyr wrote

Also something that gets lost in the shuffle here…while this area is pretty rural this was just down the street from a preschool. This guy was super reckless and the jury may need to get checked for TBI.

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viperlemondemon t1_j641vww wrote

Or his department/ police union threatened the jury if they said he was guilty

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sb_747 t1_j65j51x wrote

He was off duty and not convicted.

Union contracts can be amazing.

Can’t be fired for off duty behavior that didn’t lead to a conviction is unfortunately fairly standard in a lot of their contracts.

Imagine if unions weren’t just for shithead killers in this country.

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tundey_1 t1_j647o6s wrote

Not the 5 in Memphis, TN. They were immediately fired and charged with murder. I suppose them being Black is just a coincidence. But if I were a Black cop in America, I would not assume the murder carte blanche applies to me.

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Chippopotanuse t1_j63ndjn wrote

“Prosecutors dropped the charges”

Fuck. Those. Weak. Ass. Abuse. Enablers.

A history of domestic violence is the single biggest predictor of violent crime.

Any prosecutor who turns a blind eye to domestic violence should be fired on the spot.

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infin8lives t1_j656038 wrote

I work in the industry. Often time the Prosecution has no choice but to drop the charges in DOMV cases as there’s no cooperation from the victim. Even though the State WANTS to prosecute the bastard, there’s no way to get a conviction when both the defendant and victim say it never happened.

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jstenoien t1_j65oeux wrote

In this particular case that would not be the case because the person being abused was 10.

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RaabsIn513 t1_j648tpa wrote

The people need to have their own court with their own justice as they see fit.

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ESGPandepic t1_j62xb1z wrote

Maybe they need to start teaching girls in school not to date or marry cops when they grow up, domestic violence from cops seems to be absurdly common and their law enforcement friends protect them from any consequences. Having a relationship with one seems to be statistically an extremely bad idea.

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tundey_1 t1_j647c5y wrote

>Tl;dr: off duty cop tried to stop someone for driving recklessly

by shooting at him recklessly.

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MidLifeHalfHouse t1_j62vskr wrote

I’m honestly surprised a parent was arrested on this TBH. Or maybe my view is skewed because it was the norm for my neighborhood.

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heyman- t1_j61jen8 wrote

I assume an initial posting of this got removed as this seems to have broken hours ago.

https://www.providencejournal.com/story/news/courts/2023/01/26/daniel-dolan-pawtucket-police-officer-found-not-guilty-in-teen-shooting/69843806007/

More info here. Looks pretty bad.

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StellarTitz t1_j61k4cf wrote

That man is scum. I can't believe how foolish average people (the jury) are for not seeing anything wrong with this.

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seatown2nyc t1_j61momf wrote

Jurors have to swear an oath to follow the law as it's explained to them by the judge, and the laws are made to protect cops. It's as simple as that unfortunately

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HelloPeopleOfEarth t1_j61ozqk wrote

Not to mention there is a percentage of people that just always side with the police. American exceptionalism has trained people to think police/military are angels doing gods work.

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StellarTitz t1_j61vulp wrote

By the sound of the evidence, it was obvious the cop lied about his life being in danger.

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seatown2nyc t1_j61yiq2 wrote

That's where the "police are heroes" bs comes into play. A regular person who claims to have feared for their life objectively unreasonably will get laughed out of court and straight to prison, but when a cop does it people think "well they do have a dangerous job..."

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hurdurBoop t1_j62662c wrote

and they don't, relatively. cop deaths don't even make the top ten, they're behind freaking kitchen employees.

not to mention at least half those deaths are traffic accidents, not tHiN bLuE LiNE bs.

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jonathanrdt t1_j63qk60 wrote

If you say you will not follow a judge’s instruction or take the word of an officer, you will never be selected for a jury.

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HelloPeopleOfEarth t1_j63rm77 wrote

I used to work for a Detroit based bank doing security escorts for bank employees that had to testify in bank robberies, check fraud, or whatever they were victims/witness of crimes at the bank branches. Even though it was Detroit, a basically all black city, the jurors in the defendants trials were never "a jury of peers". It was always old white people from the suburbs because the cases were tried in a county court. A prosecutor or a defense attorney can really stack a jury the way they want to during selection. Also, poor people don't get paid days off from their low paying jobs, so they tend to do whatever they can to be dismissed, where as well to do people have all the time in the world. Those well to do people can be very out of touch and think cops are always the "good guys".

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Dolthra t1_j63ztlg wrote

>Also, poor people don't get paid days off from their low paying jobs, so they tend to do whatever they can to be dismissed, where as well to do people have all the time in the world.

Reminder that it's designed to be that way- you technically do get paid for jury duty. It's supposed to compensate for lost time. Those in power have neglected to make it reflect the amount of work you're losing, and it's like $3 a day. That's not an accident, it's to ensure only those who would side with those in power will sit on juries.

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HelloPeopleOfEarth t1_j6474ah wrote

Absolutely. Jury duty should compensate 100% of missed pay and elections should be a paid holiday, employees allowed the time to vote. Shouldn't be long lines. People should be allowed to pass out water etc. But one party in particular wants voting to be difficult for the working poor, knowing they overwhelmingly vote progressive.

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Amiiboid t1_j647bpu wrote

> , and it's like $3 a day.

While it’s nowhere near sufficient, it is also nowhere near that low. Varies by county but generally at least $30 for the first day and more thereafter.

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jstenoien t1_j65qpp3 wrote

https://superiorcourt.maricopa.gov/jury/juror-compensation/

$12/day IF you're picked. You bet your ass I made sure to get out of it ASAP when I was selected.

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Amiiboid t1_j65zplz wrote

That’s where you are. It’s more in MI, which is what the post upstream of this was mentioning. It’s apparently $15 in Rhode Island. As I said, it’s absolutely still not sufficient. But $3 as an estimate is way off.

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commandrix t1_j61rcj5 wrote

Unfortunately so. Even allowing for one or two jurists who know that "jury nullification" is a thing, the law doesn't necessarily allow for a lot of flexibility. (For those who don't know, "jury nullification" was supposed to be a sort of a check on the judicial system that allowed a jury to say "not guilty" when they thought the law was being unfairly applied.)

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sb_747 t1_j65jpvy wrote

> For those who don’t know, “jury nullification” was supposed to be a sort of a check on the judicial system that allowed a jury to say “not guilty” when they thought the law was being unfairly applied.

That’s not true.

It’s a bug not a feature.

And this is arguably a case of jury nullification. Guy committed murder but gets off because someone in the jury likes cops despite them being guilty.

It’s like the filibuster, regards of noble and heroic it may seem it’s actually used 99% of the time to fuck over the public and help abuse the system not help it.

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OldHotness t1_j660c3v wrote

Juries have the option to stick it to the judge/prosecutor/whomever through qht they commonly call "jury nullification". Seems to be uber rare when it comes to shit cops and their policing.

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XLV-V2 t1_j6427vv wrote

Jury nullification is a thing. They don't have to follow the law to a T. It's all based on judgement call. So you can see where the jury sits on this specific case.

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JohnChimpo7 t1_j63ogem wrote

He actually wasn’t tried as a cop, whatever laws you’re referring to were irrelevant

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CheeseStandsAlone262 t1_j63o9jh wrote

A week or two ago I was grabbing food for lunch and a table of cops were eating. An old white lady walked up to their table and took them each by the hand to "thank them for their service," her eyes brimming with adorational tears. In some sleepy suburban area with basically no crime.

That's who sits on juries.

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[deleted] t1_j63qpg7 wrote

[deleted]

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CheeseStandsAlone262 t1_j63r7zz wrote

Agree to disagree buddy. Every person I knew from growing up who became a cop was an unpopular, sore loser. The kid who broke my Gamecube controller because I beat him at Smash [and lied and told my parents I did it] is a cop now.

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[deleted] t1_j63riw8 wrote

[deleted]

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CheeseStandsAlone262 t1_j63s8sv wrote

Why don't I ever see old white ladies thanking doctors, nurses, teachers, etc.?

You want my vibe check on it? I live in the South. You can tell a lot about people, especially older people, by how they dress.

This was a conservative, racist old white lady thanking cops because she hears on the news about how BLM "hates cops." They probably had to stop her before she started going on and on about how "those people" are ruining our town.

I'd bet every dollar I have on it.

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RonocG t1_j63jrl8 wrote

The judge specifically told the jury to treat him as an ordinary citizen, not as a cop on duty or off duty. He also happened to be driving an unregistered vehicle and had an open beer bottle in his cup holder. Also testified that the car the kids were in hit him, which he never said to police when they interrogated him. I can’t imagine what the jury was thinking. Also read the article linked above, especially the last part. He’s had multiple instances of use of excessive force on duty and been sued for it. The criminal charges against him for assaulting his family members were dropped… what a surprise.

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polecy t1_j62e0d1 wrote

Honestly sometimes this shit makes me feel like we as people should just take this justice to our own hands, we the people should decide if govt officials/workers are guilty or not, fuck the system. It's obviously blind for their enforcers.

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JohnChimpo7 t1_j63od4c wrote

Yeah dude, “we the people” is called a “jury”.

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TheRedContinues t1_j62s9fq wrote

This happened in my hometown. The guy is a police officer from about ten towns over, and he was on a federal interstate when this happened in an unmarked car so of course the guy wouldn't pull over. He followed him to a pizza place just off the highway, cornered him, then shot him. We often have problems with police in the area being brutal for no reason and doing shit like this, so I am not surprised that this happened. But he shouldn't of been acquitted from it. Just more cops doing bullshit in a state that's supposed to be 'liberal'.

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OssiansFolly t1_j63jav1 wrote

"Violence against police is on the rise!"

Yeah, no shit...it's kill or be killed for some people. That's why the entire premise of more guns means more polite civilization is ridiculous...you always want to be the first person to shoot.

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TheRedContinues t1_j63mm57 wrote

In this case the victim was an unarmed teenager who was speeding and made the police office angry, so in response he cornered and shot him. It wasn't necessarily kill or be killed, unless I misunderstood you.

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OssiansFolly t1_j63txkf wrote

I wasn't speaking in this case specifically. Police want to know why violence against them is up...it's because of shit like this. People expect police to be violent and get away with it, so they're fighting back.

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Mparker15 t1_j64uc2l wrote

Violence against police isn't up in any meaningfully way. Police kill more people and are killed less often in the line of duty than several decades ago. There is a recent uptick but it's still a rarity. It's not so much actual violence that police are facing but rather public disapproval of police in general that they absolutely cannot handle.

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Chippopotanuse t1_j63n37z wrote

Undercover cops should only be used for stakeouts and court-approved warrant operations.

Police should never be doing this bullshit unmarked car traffic citation crap. Why would a motorist trust that an unmarked car is really a cop?

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NYR_LFC t1_j61w9t9 wrote

This dude has 2 other active cases against him and another dropped recently. Rules for thee and not for me much? Fuck the police

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ShitFuckDickButt420 t1_j623o1o wrote

Also said he grabbed his ten year old by the neck and threw him out of the car, then broke the windshield by throwing a toy at the car with his family inside. He perfectly fits the stereotype of an abusive militarized piece of shit loser needledick racist pig.

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mohammedibnakar t1_j61sf6t wrote

Another day another lack of police accountability. And on the same day that 5 cops were charged with murder three weeks after beating someone to death. When will we decide enough is enough?

/r/PoliceAccountability

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forestrox t1_j61yv9p wrote

Second degree murder. There needs to be a harsher category when the people entrusted with state sanctioned violence commit these crimes. They must be held to a higher standard to build back and maintain public trust.

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FlimFlamMagoo728 t1_j64c42w wrote

Second degree murder just means that there isn't premeditation. Which is the appropriate charge in this case - it would take proof that these guys all went out there with the intention of doing this. It is the right charge, and overcharging leads to acquittals.

I absolutely agree that there should be an added level of penalty for cops that break the law though.

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forestrox t1_j64jo2k wrote

Premeditation can be established within seconds of the encounter if the police had an opportunity to de-escalate. The prosecution may be using second degree for an easier conviction. It’ll definitely be interesting to see what the video shows of the incident. Either way I am glad the chief is being proactive on this case. Change is slow but it’s happening. Body cams are finally validating what many minorities have long said about police encounters.

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FlimFlamMagoo728 t1_j64kw9f wrote

Just because it can be established doesn’t mean it will be… idk I think Second is the right charge if the goal is to actually convict.

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forestrox t1_j64m96f wrote

For sure, I agree. We need to see more convictions in these cases. It’s eroding public trust in law enforcement at this point being so cliche that they rarely face consequences.

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Bedbouncer t1_j6dhdpw wrote

>Premeditation can be established within seconds of the encounter if the police had an opportunity to de-escalate.

Under this definition, can you define a murder that would qualify as without premeditation?

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forestrox t1_j6duy65 wrote

If I recall those usually fall under Felony Murder and are crimes of passion, or deaths caused by indirect action.

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[deleted] t1_j622f6y wrote

[removed]

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starman123 t1_j625r6x wrote

> a violent overthrow of corporate overlords is the only option.

That requires getting off the computer and going outside, something I doubt many Redditors have the right to do.

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mohammedibnakar t1_j6274pl wrote

Those who make peaceful protest impossible make violent revolution inevitable.

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JohnChimpo7 t1_j63onaz wrote

They prosecuted him, that at least is attempted accountability. You can’t force a jury to find someone guilty, even if they’re wrong

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PositionParticular99 t1_j61m10k wrote

Of course he did, police are nothing but a state sanctioned criminal gang.

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hpark21 t1_j61yka0 wrote

Basically, it all boils down to whether a normal person would have had same outcome and the answer is 'NO'. If it was me who shot that teen, then I would definitely NOT be acquitted and he should NOT have either.

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Foe117 t1_j61r3az wrote

If more and more of these acquittals with QI as a factor come out, some day someone will take a "Vigilante" justice on an officer, regardless of an actual complaint. Endangering both public and LEOs out there minding their own business on a random day.

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Generalbuttnaked69 t1_j61xney wrote

Qualified immunity doesn’t factor into a criminal trial, it has to do with whether or not LE agency’s and personal can be sued civilly.

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ruiner8850 t1_j61vz33 wrote

Qualified immunity shouldn't even come into consideration when they aren't even on duty.

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SST0617 t1_j6291bh wrote

It doesn’t have anything to do with this case, it only applies in civil trials. This was a criminal proceeding.

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victorix58 t1_j629vys wrote

This is a criminal case. It has nothing to do with QI.

Also, jury of 12 acquitted him. A lot of people blaming the system, but it sounds like that jury's fault to me.

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SST0617 t1_j628q97 wrote

This has nothing to do with qualified immunity. He was acquitted in a criminal trial. Qualified immunity has no bearing on a non-civil trial. Please stop spreading false info if you don’t know what you are talking about.

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Binlawdy t1_j62wz5f wrote

Wait, so if he wasn't tried as an officer, just found not guilty as an average citizen, does that mean RI just set legal precedant for being able to walk up to any teenager in any parking lot, yelling at them while aiming a gun in their direction, and then shooting at them when they try to run away from you?

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tundey_1 t1_j6477d8 wrote

In Stand Your Ground states, you can do that. Just make sure there's no video and the victim is dead. And of course, being the right color helps too. But mostly make sure your victim is dead.

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ruiner8850 t1_j61wf37 wrote

> The city of Pawtucket sent a statement to NBC 10 News about Dolan's future, saying it's obligated to follow the Law Enforcement Officers' Bill of Rights, or LEOBOR.

So it sounds like he gets to keep his job if he wants it? Don't worry though, from what I've seen in other cases they'll just offer him early retirement with a full pension and benefits.

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YomiKuzuki t1_j61y15d wrote

> When asked what’s next for him, Dolan said he hasn’t gotten that far yet. And if he could say something to the young men in the car?

> "I think that’s between myself and the young men," Dolan said.

Wouldn't be surprised if he intends to finish the job.

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BurgerMcKinley t1_j63s95f wrote

It must be so cool to be a cop, when you can just literally do whatever the fuck you want.

Wake up, get drunk, try to pull over cars in your personal car, beat the shit out of whoever, kill your neighbor’s dog, start a fight and then kill those people, go home, beat your family, fall asleep drunk.

It’s like the postal game irl.

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demarr t1_j61m5z5 wrote

Someone is that government just got a new hired gun. I wonder how long it will take to release the jury notes. In small towns these things are driven by favors

"Relief is one emotion, yes," Dolan told NBC 10 News

When asked what’s next for him, Dolan said he hasn’t gotten that far yet.

The other is worry that he is owned now

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JohnChimpo7 t1_j64x3mf wrote

I wouldn’t call Pawtucket a small town, it’s got 75K people and is basically an appendage of Providence

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Kaiisim t1_j62p7du wrote

American Juries are a complete state and are clearly just doing whatever they feel like at this point.

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Darth_Innovader t1_j673t7d wrote

I was on a jury for a criminal case for a couple weeks and it was truly concerning how ignorant, openly biased and irrational our peers can be. Seems like a bad system!

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Castrated_Monkey69 t1_j61y7hg wrote

Is the one where he’s eating a burger in his car in I think San Antonio then just gets fucking shot at by a cop?

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ScrewAttackThis t1_j623ng6 wrote

It's different but very similar. I was confused at first too because I didn't think that one went to trial yet.

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Kobebeef1988 t1_j621eu3 wrote

Different one, I thought the same thing at first. I’m a pessimist by nature, but even I’d be shocked if that cop doesn’t get convicted.

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SeeIKindOFCare t1_j6355j1 wrote

But if a citizen did the same it be attempted murder

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TAC1313 t1_j63na2t wrote

Where do they find jurors that will ALWAYS side with law enforcement?

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globular_fluster t1_j64lgwb wrote

Welcome to jury nullification!

The phenomenon that Redditors get a hyperboner for.

They think it will be used to let potheads go but it's only ever used by people who think cops are the only thing standing between them and the "thugs" roaming the streets.

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BruntFCA_ t1_j63qbb3 wrote

*Pawtucket Police allowed to murder at will

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hpark21 t1_j63xysi wrote

This actually sets precedence, it appears. Looks like ANY citizen can stop anyone that they feel did traffic violation and shoot them if they try to drive away since this guy who was SUPPOSEDLY treated as regular citizen got away with it.

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FlimFlamMagoo728 t1_j64cak7 wrote

Feel like at this point if you actually get onto a jury trying a cop for something you have a moral obligation to vote to convict, I mean imagine how bad whatever they do must be to even get to trial in the first place.

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justforthearticles20 t1_j64d3fi wrote

Usually when this happens, the prosecutor and the judge helped the defense. Corrupt Cops only exist because Corrupt Prosecutors and Corrupt Judges conspire with them.

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sekirobestiro t1_j65rp9t wrote

I really hope this cop remains healthy and definitely doesn’t get brained during a traffic stop.

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HawkOfTheMist t1_j6ey7tw wrote

well that's enough internet for me today.

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skippyspk OP t1_j63ya3a wrote

Fingers crossed Officer Dolan ultimately receives the justice he deserves.

I hope the (now) gentleman can rake Dolan and the Pawtucket PD over the coals in a civil suit.

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[deleted] t1_j63c5t4 wrote

[removed]

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JohnChimpo7 t1_j63otb4 wrote

Victim was white too

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hypespud t1_j63ovv3 wrote

Makes a difference how?

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JohnChimpo7 t1_j63qe2e wrote

How does the defendant’s race make a difference, but the victim’s race is irrelevant?

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[deleted] t1_j61jvyb wrote

[removed]

−134

itsajaguar t1_j61mwvt wrote

You mean don't back up to flee when you're aggressively accosted by an armed man. The cop ran after the kid and placed himself near the car then shot the kid.

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robertgrayson t1_j61nrjc wrote

Right? The shithead wasn't even in uniform and was driving his personal vehicle when he approached the driver with a gun, plus the ballistic evidence shows the driver was shot though the side-window, so the shithead wasn't even in front of him.

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Lewisportage t1_j61pp9p wrote

He started an altercation with a carful of kids while he was wearing street clothes, scared the shit out of them and shot them. He was the aggressor.

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ruiner8850 t1_j61vj1z wrote

I don't understand the mentality some people have where they think it's okay to be the aggressor and then kill a person when it gets out of hand and they try to defend themselves. It shouldn't be legal to arm yourself and then go around confronting other people. This goes for everyone, not just cops.

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Psychological-Law950 t1_j6242pl wrote

EXACTLY!! This is what I’ve been emphasizing on like crazy. People with guns are now literally starting to instigate situations that they have no business involving themselves in the first place, and when the shit hits the fan(the shit they started) their gun is their first resort because they “felt threatened” or were “in fear for their life”. It’s gotten waaaaay out of control

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PaxNova t1_j62foaf wrote

Off-duty cops. On-duty, the government is literally telling them to arm themselves and go around confronting people. I'm not sure how to get around that shy of eliminating guns for officers, and I don't think that'll fly in the US.

I don't think people are understanding this is a criminal trial, and the jury must be convinced beyond a reasonable doubt. A rock could convince a jury that a group of teens that went 100+ on the shoulder to grab pizza might do something stupid, and that an officer might confront reckless driving and felony speeding while off-duty. This result is not surprising.

There might still be a civil trial, and I hope there is. I'm not sure qualified immunity will apply here, since reckless driving is sometimes specifically called out as something off-duty police are highly discouraged from confronting people over. Depends on the local policies and regulations.

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skippyspk OP t1_j61owva wrote

How messed up in the head do you have to be to defend the actions of someone that opened fire at a pizza joint?

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